Value UnderPainting

February 26, 2008

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As I’ve searched the internet looking for artists who actually know how to digitally paint, I’ve noticed that a lot of them work the values up on their pictures first and then build color up on top of that. I am thinking this is a classic oil painting procedure, but I’ve never been able to do grease paint so I wouldn’t know. I tried the value first approach on this little study.

The Comments

Otto Meza

Hi… i’m not an artist I do my job in the other way… snif snif … it seems like I’ve been wrong all my life.. snif snif

Jason Bourne

Awesome. Like the grey background. And the highlights on the nose.

Nick Jones Everybody

I usually just try to under value my painting. Seems to work better for me.

Doug Jones

so do you add a layer (on multiply) on top of the value layer and paint transparently over it or what?

Don Jones

I wanna know how you are cranking out so much creative stuff… painting, drawings, stuffed creatures, etc. Has Indiana voted additional hours into their mixed up Amish Central/Eastern time zone scheme?

Dennis Jones

…Don, as soon as Karen leaves for school I quit working and begin playing… don’t let the cat outta the bag…

…Doug, I still don’t have a set “system” worked out yet, but on this one, I think I put the pencil sketch on multiply… worked the value in underneath on a layer… blocked color in on a layer on top of the sketch in multiply mode… flattened the whole thing and then worked color over the top on a normal mode layer…

Don Jones

This looks identical to your standard retro-traditional gouache technique. Sweet.

Dennis Jones

…yup …I’m pretty much just trying to come up with a way to duplicate my traditional watercolor style digitally…

Doug Jones

It’s looking good… not a lot of difference I can see from your gow-shay paint. So here is my question. It seems to me that painting is painting, no matter what the medium. I takes a certain amount of time to “paint” something… as opposed to dumping in flat color with a paint bucket. So… I’m thinking the only time you save this way, is not having to cut up watercolor paper or wash out your brushes… …dat right?

Dennis Jones

…well, that’s what I’m still trying to figure out…

…when I pencil out an idea, traditionally I have to tape it to the back of a piece of watercolor paper and draw it again on the watercolor paper in order to paint it on the watercolor paper… digitally I’m just scanning that sketch in and cleaning it up as I paint so I am eliminating that “redrawing” time…

…I think (I’m still not sure) that I can Digitally paint faster than I can Traditional paint… that is the main reason you are seeing so many experimental things out of me right now… I’m right in the middle of really trying to figure this whole thing out…

…it’s pretty easy for me to get things half way there digitally, but it’s the finishing touches I’m still struggling to get down…

Otto Meza

Dennis, what you prefer to do: gouache technique or photoshop technique?

Dennis Jones

…Otto… color is really what is at play here…

…I have really tight control over my work when I use traditional media, but I can’t match the quality of color that I can achieve with the computer… so I am tossing away the security of doing something that works every time (gouache) in order to possibly achieve something better in a medium I have yet to master…

…I would rather use gouache because I can control it, but the potential benefits of digital painting seem to be forcing me in that direction…

Otto Meza

thanks… some people say: “in digital painting we miss the human touch and human mistake”

Jason Bourne

A delema indeed…

James

DJ, My question is when you scan your work don’t you have to select the pen tool and outline your work placing it into different layers, it would seem that would take the longest beside deciding and matching of colors… Am I out of my tree in assuming this? God Bless my friend another fine piece. ZAZ

Jon Slone

Question, I was comforted a long time ago when i found out walt disney artists actually hired people to come in and model for them. Now they use clay 3 demensional models. The point being, they needed to look at something rather than just see it in their mind’s eye. Do you do that as well dennis? I know certain things get easier like faces and what not but like for bigger more complicated pics, do you find it necessary to look at something? If not now…did you use to?

Dennis Jones

James… uhm… I’m not exactly sure what you are talking about, so I’m pretty sure I’m not doing that… I never use the pen tool for anything… all I am doing with my scanned artwork is turning its layer to multiply… this allows me to see thru the layer and retain the line work… then I can paint under the line work on a different layer and over the line work on another layer as need be… does that make sense?

Dennis Jones

Jon… if I go to the trouble of finding reference my work is usually better for the extra effort… I’ve found the simplest way to go is to just Google up whatever I need a reference photo of…

James

Thanks Dennis, it does make sense. As a Graphic Artist back in the day we needed to outline the image which moves it from a bipmat to a vector image then you can color it, resize it all that stuff. The hair would be one layer the face another layer etc. at the end we would flatten it. I’m sorry my friend, I’m new at this and enjoy your work allot. My little ones have all your Bibles it’s great work and Thanks for sharing with us what and how you do what you do. James

Dennis Jones

James, there is something else you can do with your line work in order to color it… first unlock your linework layer… put a layer underneath it filled with white… select your linework layer again… then pull up the channel palette and click one of those little buttons at the bottom that says “load channel as selection”…move back to your layers palette… hit delete… deselect… find the lock buttons on the layers palette and hit the “lock transparent pixels button”… now take a hard mechanical brush and paint black over the linework… this restores the black lines… now you can grab different colors and experiment with coloring different areas of your line work with different colors…

James

Thanks Dennis, I’ll give it a try.

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